Gaffe (Matthew 26:74-75)

“A gaffe is when a politician tells the truth — some obvious truth he isn’t supposed to say.”

Michael Kinsley, American Journalist and Political Commentator 

With the prominence of social media, gaffes that would only occasionally be reported are now instantaneously blared throughout the world. Gaffes are not limited to politicians, anyone may commit them. However, whether the gaffe is the truth is open to interpretation. 

One possible gaffe is recorded in the Bible. Jesus Christ had been arrested by the Jewish leadership and was on trial. While this was happening, Peter, one of Jesus’ closest disciples was lurking nearby. Unfortunately, he was recognized by several people who accused him of being one of Jesus’ followers. Peter defended himself three times, denying that he knew Jesus.

Peter swore, “A curse on me if I’m lying—I don’t know the man!” And immediately the rooster crowed. Suddenly, Jesus’ words flashed through Peter’s mind: “Before the rooster crows, you will deny three times that you even know me.” And he went away, weeping bitterly. 

Matthew 26:74-75 (NLT)

Peter was desperately attempting to save himself stating that he didn’t know the Man. Of course it was a lie, but did he inadvertently speak the truth? In spite of being with Jesus for three years, witnessing numerous miracles, his very words may have revealed his heart and true feelings. Perhaps He truly didn’t know Jesus? If he did, he would not have denied His Lord and Savior. 

It was a tragic statement. Yet sometimes I wonder if I would have done the same if I was in the place of Peter? When life is comfortable, it is easy to proclaim my love for Jesus Christ but if I was threatened with imprisonment, torture, and execution, would I have faltered?

Was it a gaffe? For all who claim to follow Jesus Christ, we should ask ourselves if we truly know the Man. Do we know what the Truth is?

Love and trust in the Lord; seek His will in your life.

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